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Author Topic: U-20 Women's Team Thread.  (Read 65136 times)

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Online FF

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #630 on: January 21, 2018, 01:41:36 PM »
Jamal Shabazz is a dumb ass.

You losing 3-1 facing certain elimination and you are not committing numbers forward. No press, no support in forward positions, no commitment to the attack.

Absolutely ridiculous.  :pissedoff:
he was never going to beat Canada or seriously threaten their goal. Why make the score look worse than it was. If we played with 14 we may not get a organized attack, what makes you think Shabazz will get a win down 3-1 with 10. When I putting down the coach, prefer to keep it real. My only quarrel with the man is, he not aware of football outside the nation.

Don't totally agree with that.

Costa Rica could have said the same thing, but look at how they responded and what it did to Haiti. We needed to play for 1 goal at a time. I'm not saying attack with reckless abandon, but we had some nice spots where we could have took a chance and we never did. We resigned from early to not "losing bad". That's coward, and taught our players that they are indeed inferior. I don't like that approach.

We've been surrendering like this for decades and now it seems to be who we are. This is why at 1-1 we wilt. We show no fight or mental fortitude to fight back especially when we're leading and give up goals.
"Saving face" needs to not be part of who we are.

Elan. I agree with you here. There was some points where the forward break out and create some penetration on the Canadian flank. When you do so, not one iota of support. She try she best but end up losing out to a 1v3. When you look so we midfield and defense 40 yards behind the play just gazing.

That was well frustrating. I say like Shabazz find we play too high against Haiti and over compensate against Canada. I ent know how else to explain it.
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Offline maxg

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #631 on: January 21, 2018, 04:19:19 PM »
Anbrat: I don't think so, Depending on what you calling recent. And anybody can beat anybody one off.
Storeboy: How much matches against better teams Haiti played. They probably have a closer knit team than us, with a dedicated coach, admin and support group. Yes, our Teams have not been fit. I think we need a scientific model to work with. Many intl coaches are aware of the level needed, as they have seen a wide range of players. Our current coach knows Guyana and TT men, and possibly a few other caribbean players.


Elan: Nobody takes the field expecting to lose. Haiti was also down 2 to us and won. But down to 10, with the correct preparation, strategies and prepared players one can sometimes work wonders. We have none of that. Blame the admin, blame the Coaching. However, the bottom line, the girls were not properly prepared for a 90 minute game, farless a come from behind. There is talent there, but at World Level, talent is not enough. They would have been totally embarrased had they pushed up further and tried to support the attack more. They also had no idea what to do. I think they did well considering the circumstances and lack of proper prep. Shabazz may not be the best coach, but he is not the worse. I don't think Ellis or Alvarez could have made a difference given the timeframe, lack of matches and admin lack of  prep.  Some girls came in  what 2 weeks ago ? these are not pro players who job is the game. We can compete, but not when all our football is in turmoil.
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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #632 on: January 21, 2018, 08:13:47 PM »
WATCH: Post-match comments from Head Coach Jamaal Shabazz following Trinidad and Tobago U-20 Women’s 4-1 loss to Canada.

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Offline Sando prince

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #633 on: January 22, 2018, 12:20:48 PM »
Shabazz what have you ever achieved  to get you that job in TTFA?
.

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #634 on: January 22, 2018, 04:04:46 PM »
WATCH LIVE: Trinidad and Tobago Women’s U-20 vs Costa Rica. Kick-off at 5:30pm EST (6:30pm local).

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #635 on: January 22, 2018, 05:15:13 PM »
GOOOAAAAALLLLL! Dennecia Prince gives Trinidad and Tobago Women’s U-20 a 1-0 lead over Costa Rica in the 37th minute.#CU20W
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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #636 on: January 22, 2018, 05:22:13 PM »
HALF-TIME: Trinidad and Tobago U-20 Women 1-0 Costa Rica. Goal by Dennicia Prince in the 37th minute.
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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #637 on: January 22, 2018, 05:44:08 PM »
GOAL: Costa Rica U-20 Women get the equalizer in the 47th minute courtesy a penalty kick.
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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #638 on: January 22, 2018, 05:51:20 PM »
GOAL: Hillary Corrales gives Costa Rica U-20 Women a 2-1 lead over Trinidad and Tobago in the 56th minute.
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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #639 on: January 22, 2018, 06:26:59 PM »
FINAL: Trinidad and Tobago U-20 Women 1-2 Costa Rica. Goal for T&T by Dennecia Prince (37’). Goals for Costa Rica by Fabiola Villalobos (47’) and Hillary Corrales (56’).
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Offline coache

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #640 on: January 22, 2018, 08:48:20 PM »
Shabazz is ah borse!!

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #641 on: January 22, 2018, 09:13:08 PM »
Shabazz (the terrorist) is ah borse!!  :thumbsup:

Offline Flex

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #642 on: January 23, 2018, 02:46:54 AM »
T&T go under to Costa Rica in closing Group A match.
TTFA Media


Trinidad and Tobago’s Under 20 Women team ended their 2018 Concacaf U-20 Women’s Championship campaign on a losing note, going down 2-1 to Costa Rica in the closing Group A encounter at the Ato Boldon Stadium on Monday night.

After taking an early 1-0 lead for the third consecutive match, the Jamaal Shabazz-coached team surrendered to their opponents, eventually finishing their three matches without a point to show. Canada came away 4-0 winners over Haiti in the earlier match to finish top of Group A with nine points ahead of second placed Haiti (six points) as both teams advanced to Friday’s semi-finals.

T&T scored against the run of play in the 37th minute. Jaasiel Forde sent a lead pass from the right flank into the box to Dennecia Prince, who slotted the ball through the legs of goalkeeper Nicoles Genis for a 1-0 lead and her team-best second goal of the tournament.

Only two minutes after she came on at the half, Fabiola Villalobos made an impact by equalizing on a penalty kick after goalkeeper Klil Keshwar took her down in the box. Villalobos smashed her shot into the upper left corner to knot the score at 1-1.

In the 56th minute, Stephannie Blanco booted a free kick from the Costa Rican side of the field that glanced off the head of Trinidad’s Shenieka Paul toward the net. The ball bounded to Hillary Corrales on the left side as the midfielder deftly used the outside of her right foot to redirect into the goal before colliding with Keshwar.

T&T coach Shabazz, said there was a lot to take out of the tournament for T&T as he spoke during the post-match press conference.


“Interesting challenge and the ladies played their hearts out tonight, Shabazz said.
“I’m very satisfied that they gave of their best and it was unfortunate after leading (1-0) that we would go down because of a penalty.  I’m not one to complain about the referees  but I think the girls gave a great account of themselves.“

“I think the teams in this competition have shown a higher level of intensity than our team and it’s something we’ve got to develop in the female game,  to be a lot more intense and to be able to make more football actions. But I think also we have been very unfortunate with some decisions, you know, it was so, so unfortunate and I feel sorry for my young ladies tonight because as I said, tonight I wish I was a FIFA referee.”

Shabazz commented on forward Dennicia Prince who scored two goals for T&T in the competition.

“She’s had some explosive moments and you can see a player, with a lot of fitness, and a higher level of fitness achieved by her, she is a player ready to graduate to the senior team. And from this exercise you can see, about five or six of them going to the senior level so at least we can see that the exercise is a good one”

“Of course we learn from this and we have a program and this is one tournament(you know) we have senior team in training, we have an U-15 team in training and the next week we start the U-18s again for the next U-20. You know we’ve got to learn our lesson from this and be very honest with ourselves and know that we’ve got to make a better preparation going forward and try to prepare a team that could be more intense in the battles.”

When asked to comment about why T&T could not maintain its focus and physical levels throughout matches in other to achieve desirable results, Shabazz said it was problem beyond the football pitch as well.

“Well I think it’s not just the football, it’s our society. We have to become a national where when the hard time comes we show more resilience. It’s a training and we’ve got to improve the battles on the training pitch and in doing so it can be transformed onto the field.  Also I think we need to be able to get them playing a little bit more so that they understand the atmosphere at the next level. But all known the positive of this is that at least half of this squad can play U-20 again; so blows that don’t break the back will certainly strengthen it.”

Extras – Match Story

Game Two of matchday 5 featured host nation Trinidad and Tobago coming up against  Costa Rica. A modest crowd gathered in anticipation at the Ato Boldon stadium to witness the final performance of the young warriors in this Concacaf U-20 championship tournament. Despite having only pride to play for, both teams boasted strong starting lineups; both coaches determined to walk away with their first points of the tournament.

This fixture got off to a tame start, with both teams exercising caution in their build up play. From the get go, T&T skipper, Ranae Ward, and midfield anchor Shenieka Paul had their hands full with Costa Rican maestro, Glorianna Villalobos, whose technical proficiency and skill on the ball proved too illusive for the T&T contingent. Winger Aaliyah Prince and striker Lauren Theodore continued to be a perpetual source of excitement and energy to both team and fans, hunting down every loose pass and driving at the heart of the opposition defense when in possession. However, T&T’s standout on the night was striker Dennecia Prince who used her size, strength and speed to bully the Costa Rican defenders playing a pivotal role in T&T’s best chances.

Despite T&T’s ambitious strike force, it was Costa Rica who controlled most of the proceedings, swinging the ball comfortably from end to end. Inside the first five minutes, striker Hillary Corrales found herself played in behind the T&T backline. With only the ‘keeper to beat, she unselfishly squared the ball to fellow striker Catalina Estrada who, if not for the heroic defending of tournament debutant Crystal Molineaux, would have certainly put Costa Rica in the lead.

T&T were not to be easily outdone though, mounting surging attacks of their own. Incisive passing by the impressive Ward, often ended with measured through balls being rolled into the path of the charging (Dennecia) Prince, whose speed and work rate earned her a number of free kicks in dangerous positions. T&T unfortunately lacked the decisive quality needed in their final product and were unable to convert any of these opportunities.

The tempo in the first half took a casual dip as T&T began to give the Costa Ricans time and space in the middle of the park. This lapse in work rate was almost punished when neat interplay, led by Villaslobos, ended with a driven shot that brought out the best in keeper Klil Keshwar. It was clear that these teams were fairly balanced, but slow decision making and a general lack of energy was disrupting the rhythm of both contingents.

Costa Rica often found themselves beating T&T to the ball and getting themselves in more dangerous positions. However, individual mistakes and over complicated passing often resulted in Trinidad and Tobago being gifted the opportunity to launch swift counter attacks. If it weren’t for some wayward passing the final third and poor decision making in crucial moments, T&T would have certainly found themselves in the driver’s seat, earlier on in the game.

Despite the “tug-of-war” nature of the contest, it was T&T that got the go-ahead goal. Phenomenal composure in the back by Alexis Fortune set the stage for a tidy passage of play involving both Ward and Paul. An overlapping Jaasiel Ford was released into space and her lofted through ball fell to the feet of Dennecia Prince. With unshakable composure, Prince brilliantly took the ball in stride and rounded her defender before slotting calmly under the diving Costa Rican custodian. 1-0 T&T as they began to burst into life with the now vociferous fans fully getting behind their team.

Not long after, another dangerous break for the red, white and black ended with winger Kedie Johnson seeing her spectacular half volley parried haphazardly around the Costa Rican post. A brilliant effort matched by an equally brilliant save.

T&T continued to look lively before the half but were almost punished when Estrada was able to evade her marker and latch onto a illaslobos, through ball that carved open the T&T backline. Her attempted toe prod, however, drifted agonizingly wide. Going into the half, the scores remained unchanged with T&T, a goal to the good.

The second half saw two key attacking changes for Costa Rica. The introduction of the physically imposing Priscilla Chinchilla and the tenacious Fabiola Villaslobos added a whole new dynamic to the Costa Rican offense. So said, so done. The sheer hustle and determination of Fabiola Villaslobos drew the foul from Keshwar in the T&T goal and earned her a penalty, mere minutes after coming on. She assertively stepped up to the task and confidently blasted home her effort to pull Costa Rica level.

The half time changes clearly injected new life into the visitors as the entire team began to engage in more determined pressing further up he pitch. A meandering run through the T&T defense by Glorianna Villaslobos brought out the best in Keshwar, who raced off her line bravely to deny the Costa Rican captain.

Despite the best efforts of Fortune and her sturdy backline, T&T, unfortunately, were finally undone. A lofty freekick by center back Stephannie Blanco was mistimed by Paul, who unintentionally flicked the cross toward her own goal. The ball fell invitingly for striker Corrales who made no mistake in punishing T&T and granting the visitors a 2-1 lead.

As the game progressed, Costa Rica continued to peg T&T back further and further
back. Moments of uncharacteristically nervous handling by Keshwar in goal, led to heart
stopping moments for the T&T fans. But, whenever there was a turnover, the resolute
defence led by the outstanding Alexi Fortune served to preserve the 2-1 scoreline and
keep T&T within striking range of the Costa Ricans.

The remainder of this fixture saw T&T continue their steadfast defending, forcing Costa Rica to attack from wider positions. The fans were treated to intermittent moments of tidy play from the soca princesses but ultimately T&T struggled to convert possession into meaningful attack. As the clock winded down, T&T attempted to muster a last-ditch effort. Substitute Chelcy Ralph produced a moment of magic, rounding four players on her own and forcing a corner. However, the resulting delivery was cleared to safety, effectively sealing the victory for Costa Rica. The final result, T&T 1 – Costa Rica 2. (Report by matchtracker Renaldo Garcia)

(Teams by Wired868)

Trinidad and Tobago (4-4-2): 1.K’lil Keshwar (GK); 12.Jaasiel Forde (16.Kelsey Henry 61), 17.Alexis Fortune, 2.Crystal Molineaux, 3.Shadi Cecily Stoute; 10.Aaliyah Prince (19.Chelcy Ralph 73), 11.Ranae Ward (captain), 13.Shenieka Paul, 14.Kedie Johnson; 7.Dennecia Prince (15.Asha James 67), 9.Laurelle Theodore.

Unused substitutes: 20.Malaika Dedier (GK), 5.Nathifa Hackshaw, 6.Shaunalee Govia, 8.Megan Rampersad, 18.Brittney Williams.

Coach: Jamaal Shabazz

Costa Rica (4-2-1-3): 18.Nicoles Genis (GK); 5.Fernanda Sanabria (16.Priscilla Chinchilla 46), 15.Stephannie Blanco, 3.Jeimy Unaña, 6.Maria Paula Elizondo; 19.Daniela Coto (8.Mariela Campos 75); 10.Gloriana Villalobos (), 13.Cristal Sandi (7.Fabiola Villalobos 46); 12.Kenlly Villalobos, 17.Catalina Estrada, 14.Hillary Corrales.

Unused substitutes: 1.Fabiano Solano (GK), 2.Maria Paula Salas, 4.Maria Paula Coto, 9.Sofia Varela, 11.Juliet Navarro, 20.Yaniela Arias.

Coach: Amelia Valverde (Costa Rica)

Referee: Ekaterina Koroleva (United States)

CONCACAF Player of the Match: Gloriana Villalobos (Costa Rica)

Post-Match Press Conference - Shabazz after 2-1 loss to Costa Rica

CU20W: Trinidad & Tobago vs. Costa Rica

« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 02:56:53 AM by Flex »
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Offline elan

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #643 on: January 23, 2018, 09:27:13 AM »
We score first in 3 games and lose those 3 games.

We have more female players playing the game, yet we have not improved on the women's game.
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Offline maxg

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #644 on: January 23, 2018, 11:02:38 AM »
We score first in 3 games and lose those 3 games.

We have more female players playing the game, yet we have not improved on the women's game.
Had the opportunity to observe a women's training session at Mandela park last year. I watched for aprox an hour or a little less. Were the women/girls good or decent. I can't really say. The coach had them standing around every 10 minutes, while he explained a particular requirement/play to one player or another for about 5 minutes, every time. Most of the girls were therefore doing nothing - not even allowed to get water -, unoccupied, unfocused for at least 1/3 of the observed session. Thus these women would neither develop game fitness , flow, or ability to execute anything based on this particular practice. Maybe other sessions were more intense. I don't know.
 So even with increased numbers of girls playing the sport, what would be the final product there? Note, I will not base all of TT local women game and practice based on that one bad sample. Yet, from what I did observe years ago, with the coaching of the men's game, I would be quite concerned that the girls are not getting the proper development and training that is required to compete at a international level. Local is fine, skill and ability might be ok, execution and adaptation when faced with more intense well trained athletes might be detrimental to their performance. Being fit to run around the savannah, don't mean one can peform at highest level for 90 minutes of football.

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #645 on: January 23, 2018, 01:10:12 PM »
WATCH: Highlights of Trinidad and Tobago U-20 Women’s 2-1 loss to Costa Rica. #TRIvCRC #CU20W

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #646 on: January 23, 2018, 02:02:59 PM »
http://www.concacaf.com/video/cu20w-united-states-vs-mexico

Know thy opponents. I hope our women coaches in the stands. Although it look like about 20 ppl. Highway busy doh, plenty ppl heading everywhere else.

Jitka Klimková (born 20 August 1974) is a Czech former football defender. Throughout her career she played for Sokol Čejč, Slávia Holíč and Compex Otrokovice in the Czech First Division. She was briefly a member of the Czech national team.[1]

She currently serves as United States women's national under-20 soccer team manager.[2] She previously coached New Zealand wu-17,[3] Canberra United in Australia's W-League,[4] 1.FC Slovácko and the Czech Under-19 national team.


Mexico’s national women’s teams are very much a family concern, with Leonardo Cuellar currently in charge of the country’s senior side and his son Christopher overseeing the U-20s. (From 2014)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 02:11:19 PM by maxg »

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #647 on: January 23, 2018, 02:57:17 PM »
WATCH: Comments from players Alexis Fortune, Ranae Ward and Dennicia Prince after Trinidad and Tobago bowed out of the 2018 CONCACAF Under-20 Women’s Championship at the group stage.

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Offline elan

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #648 on: January 23, 2018, 09:53:30 PM »
We score first in 3 games and lose those 3 games.

We have more female players playing the game, yet we have not improved on the women's game.
Had the opportunity to observe a women's training session at Mandela park last year. I watched for aprox an hour or a little less. Were the women/girls good or decent. I can't really say. The coach had them standing around every 10 minutes, while he explained a particular requirement/play to one player or another for about 5 minutes, every time. Most of the girls were therefore doing nothing - not even allowed to get water -, unoccupied, unfocused for at least 1/3 of the observed session. Thus these women would neither develop game fitness , flow, or ability to execute anything based on this particular practice. Maybe other sessions were more intense. I don't know.
 So even with increased numbers of girls playing the sport, what would be the final product there? Note, I will not base all of TT local women game and practice based on that one bad sample. Yet, from what I did observe years ago, with the coaching of the men's game, I would be quite concerned that the girls are not getting the proper development and training that is required to compete at a international level. Local is fine, skill and ability might be ok, execution and adaptation when faced with more intense well trained athletes might be detrimental to their performance. Being fit to run around the savannah, don't mean one can peform at highest level for 90 minutes of football.


wow....    :frustrated:
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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #649 on: January 24, 2018, 05:16:22 PM »
maxg, I went to the US coaches convention in Philly last Sat. Saw a couple of people. Lincoln, Mike Grayson, Kendall Walkes, Howard Spencer of UTT. Not much Trini coaches came up this year because of the the govt budget crunch. We followed the games, and we watched part of the TT-Canada on SW.net in the hotel. He said that, we already know the dysfunctional side of the TTFA.  But we need to be patient with the women. The talent pool is already stretched thin to the point where we depend on foreign-born players. Then the lack of money to prepare the team is always the issue. The lack of friendlies against players in their age group. Don't compare them to US, Can, Mex, CR.  Don't even compare them to Haiti. Haiti has a wealth of talent, and there are many wealthy Haitians(local and foreign) who sponsor  football without hesitation. We have to be patient with the young Ladies.

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #650 on: January 24, 2018, 06:17:52 PM »
Oh. I am not losing patience with our lady or men footballers. However, many of our supporters, admins, and coaches make us out to be this premeir football nation, with this way more abundance talent than everyone else. Fact: We are not. We have to invest and work just as hard as any small nation and even some larger ones. We have no special elixir or dongs tree that give us any right to just run out and beat people. The country is in a unprecedented social turmoil, (gangster-ism,drugs,crime, domestic violence.. etc) besides normal society issues such as health, employment and well being. I cannot lose patience with football, especially when it, or any sport is hardly supported by those same locals, unless the atheletes on their own attain some pedestal.
Fetes, events and Shows in the next coming weeks will be packed if not sold out, and that's fine, that's our culture. We have to face the fact that football isn't. The stands for a "best in our region tournament" were relatively empty. Our coaching and development has always been very little or much to be desired. Although there are guys who are dedicated and give their all, and their life to the various sports, they are rarely recognized or helped. They work with what they have, and compared to many other countries it's not that much.  I understand that. I cannot lose patience with them. I cannot even lose patience with the Shabazz's or ppl who are constantly given the opportunity to try, albeit with very little resources and local support . I do lose patience with the majority of our people, from top to bottom, who don't give a rat's ass, until there is some measure of success. And if you listen to them at that time, you would think God has blessed us historically, present and the whole world is our future. I was upset mostly with Shabazz's pre-tournament buildup. I'm sure he believed and hyped the girls accordingly. They played well, but they were not prepared. This has been a constant re-occurence. There is no blame to be handed to our football, we have to fix ourselves and our society before when can have any real longterm success. T & T is not the T &T we once were. We have evolved into something less than what we were, and that sickness is now hell to treat. So who am I waiting patiently on. I myself feel like crap, as I am not or cannot be part of the solution. So I can`t be vex at all.  :-[

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #651 on: January 25, 2018, 03:01:31 AM »
We need Answers from T&TCB, T&TFA.
T&T Guardian Reports.


So last Thursday night my cell phone rang and the voice on the other end of the call said “boy the kinda day you had, I thought I would call you, come leh we go to CIC fete nah.” Now, those of you who know me well understand that I am a carnival baby, even though I was born on Boxing Day and love to celebrate Christmas with my family, as January 1st arrives I instantly get ready for carnival. I love all aspects of our culture Kaiso, Soca, Mas and all that goes with our carnival preparations, so there was not much convincing needed for me to attend CIC's fete, especially as it is turning out to be one of the better fetes on the carnival landscape.

Anyway, back to the cell phone conversation, I responded “what do you mean the kinda day I had?!” The person went on the state that the Red Force got bowled out for 135 on the 1st day vs Guyana and the Soca Princesses, after leading 2-0 lost 3 -2 vs Haiti. I had to remind him that it was not only me, but all true Trini sports fans who would have been feeling the pain on that unkind Thursday night.

Let's start with the cricket and to be honest, I was not surprised by the Red Force score. It is painfully obvious that the team has lost all confidence. It is also apparent that anyone who has any control of the team may as well go on a computer and play whatever games can be found, including fantasy cricket because their impact on improving the team is zero, actually it may even be considered negative. Thankfully, at least they tried something different and the batting order was changed up, however, the changes only worked to an extent, but when a team is low on confidence and batsmen are not scoring runs, you just have to hope things click and class rather than form shines through.

At the end of the game the Force were totally mauled by the Jaguars. So where do we go from here? Interestingly, I read where the head coach accepted the blame for the team finishing dead last in the standings and then, hopefully jokingly, compared our position to Guyana when they finished last and have now turned it around and won the four-day regional tournament four times in a row. Obviously, the Guyanese have put a proper structure in place with the correct personnel for the job both on and off the field. My disappointment with the statement of the coach is that he also blamed the senior players for the position we find ourselves in and of course, it is easy to put part of the blame on them, but my questions to him are how hard have they worked as a unit? Was the environment conducive to them giving optimum performance at all times during the season? Why was there so much changing of the team? Why did we play three wicketkeepers in the same starting eleven etc, etc? We were so bad in this tournament that a full examination needs to be done on the entire team, not only on their performance, but on their mental approach to the game. Additionally, what about the selectors who picked some ridiculous teams at times, they most certainly should also be held accountable and if the executive of the TTCB has any 'cojones', it will act expeditiously for the sake of the T&T cricket fans.

Then to compound matters, I had a look at our U-20 Soca princesses play Haiti and my oh my were we taken for a ride by those in authority before the tournament started. You see, given the magnitude of the tournament I thought we did our homework on the opposing teams, however, it was glaringly obvious that little was done. That aside, let's deal with our team, who we cannot blame as the players gave their all, but they looked unfit throughout the tournament which is a reflection of the coaching staff. It is a pity that the games were not 20 minutes long with 10 minute halves, as we would have easily qualified. Additionally, there seemed to be no structure to the team, the midfield was nonexistent and defensively we were all over the place. Even if we could not match our opponents in terms of skill, at least we could have put out a fit team as it is inexcusable in this modern era not to be able to run for a full 90 minutes.

Consequently, as the host nation, we finished last in the group not winning a game and as usual all the dotish excuses have started to filter through, but just like the TTCB, the TTFA has to take action as you owe it to the football fans of this nation to investigate what went wrong and give us an explanation as the sports loving public are fed up with all the excuses and the time for swift and decisive action is now, it is 2018 for heaven's sake, when are we going to get serious with sport in this country?!?

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Offline Flex

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #652 on: January 26, 2018, 02:50:31 AM »
Corneal not surprised by early elimination; slams dependence on magic in successive youth tournaments.
By Roneil Walcott (Wired868).


It would have come as no surprise to Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) Technical Director Anton Corneal that Trinidad and Tobago’s hopes of going to the Under-20 Women’s World Cup came crashing down yesterday evening.

Having lost 2-3 to Haiti in their opening CONCACAF qualifier at the Ato Boldon Stadium in Couva on Thursday, the Junior Women Soca Warriors could not get the positive result they needed against Group A favourites Canada, who beat them 4-1 in yesterday’s second outing.

Corneal suggested to Wired868 in an interview between both games that Trinidad and Tobago has been hoping for magic. In vain.

“There is no magic formula; it is only work,” he stressed. “It is time spent on the ball, it is time spent playing games and getting exposure over and over so we could develop all areas of the game. Not just technically and tactically but the mental and physical side of the game also.”

Convinced that the country’s football administrators must be able to move past the mentality of playing from tournament to tournament and map out a long-term development plan for young players, Corneal says that he shares his vision for the game nationally with the relevant coaches—including the ones handling the Under-20 Women.

“I’m in constant discussion with the coaches, especially of the Under-20 team,” Corneal said. “We have had discussions. And right after the game [against Haiti], we had a chat about development. One team was more ready and we discussed why…”

“After [watching] the game [against Haiti],” he added, pointing to the tactical and technical superiority Haiti displayed in the Thursday game, “I thought there were areas that we needed to address and areas which should have been addressed four years ago.”

Although coach Jamaal Shabazz’s charges stormed into a 2-0 lead after only ten minutes against Haiti and again scored in the opening minutes in yesterday’s game against Canada, they never got their passes together in midfield and were guilty of too many errant long balls.

So is there a certain style of football the TD would like to see played consistently in the girls’ football programme? And is there a shared vision?

The only way the two-island republic can maximize the full potential of its burgeoning football talents, the TD is quite certain, is through years of sacrifice, coaching, scouting and diligent work on the training field. Merely continuing to focus on competitions and tournaments, he emphasizes, simply will not get us where we want to be.

“It’s about total development and understanding the game properly,” said Corneal. “It’s about covering the four components of the game, the technique, tactics and mental and physical aspects of the game. And as we grow and we start seeing our strengths and weaknesses and what players we have available to us, then we can decide what’s the best way for us to play to maximize our strengths.”

Corneal pointed out that the Haitian team, now under the watchful eyes of former France youth team coach Marc Collat, have had years of continuous planning and preparation through their Goal Project.

Reiterating his belief that the key period in a player’s development is during the five years from age 12 to 16, the Technical Director suggests that the TTFA would do well to try and emulate their Caribbean counterparts.

“There is some room for growth and growth which has to be done right away […] in order to close the gap,” he said. “We have to realize the importance of what we do outside of tournaments and not just (when we are in) tournament mode.

“When we are out of a tournament, there is so much work to be done after a tournament […]. I think [that game] gave us a clear idea into the type of preparation that a team like Haiti would have done and why they are now reaping the rewards.”

He zeroed in on where he thought the real problem lay.

“Anytime you address the Under-20 team, we are really looking at a development process from five to six years before,” he explained. “And that’s the golden learning age of a player, from 12 to 16 years old. If we don’t address it properly there, we will not get the players to their true potential. And that affected us and I think it will continue to affect us.

“We first have to decide how much we are willing to sacrifice when the players are younger and [recognize] the type of work that needs to be done, the concentrated type of work that needs to be done.”

There are two 16-year-olds in the current Under-20 set-up in the persons of defender Nathifa Hackshaw and lively attacker Aaliyah Prince. Only two years ago, both girls were members of a Trinidad and Tobago team which went to the CONCACAF Under-15 Championship in Orlando.

How does Corneal think these girls have adapted themselves to the demands of Under-20 football?

“I am not one of the staff members on the team so to make a comment like that will be ill-advised of me,” Corneal told Wired868. “What I could say is that I’m happy certain players were able to close the gap from the Under-17s to Under-20s. It’s good when you see a few players could do it […]

“Our way of addressing this is the National Elite Youth Program with 12-, 13- and 14-year-old girls from all the zones coming together to do a little more concentrated work so we could address these problems now.”

There is already a girls’ National Elite Youth Program (NEYP), which has Marlon Charles—Shabazz’s Under-20 team assistant—as head coach and Trinidad and Tobago Women’s Senior Team winger Ahkeela Mollon as one of its coaches. Corneal says that the response to the NEYP has been decent up to now but he would still like to see a strengthening of the player involvement on the girls’ side of things.

“I’ll be guessing here but the Elite Youth Program will have about 50 to 60 players coming out from the zones,” he said. “The zones fluctuate with the number of players and the age-group fluctuates [as well] because, as I said, we don’t have a lot of girls playing.”

So is there a plan to address this, to get more girls involved in football from the grassroots level right up to national team level?

“One of the ways we have been doing it is in the primary schools,” said Corneal. “There is a grassroots programme that is going to be done every Wednesday where we will try to target as many as 2,000 kids between the ages of nine and ten. We have made it compulsory that half must be boys and half must be girls.

“Let’s grow the number of young girls playing the game and, hopefully through the primary schools, we will get a growth right there.”

The Senior Women’s Team narrowly missed out on qualification for the 2015 Women’s World Cup after falling to Ecuador in a play-off on home soil. Now, another Women’s World Cup is just one year away. Is there any plan to phase new players into the team so that there will be no problem when some of the core players withdraw from international duty?

Corneal recalled that years of persistent attention and scrutiny had gone into the development of key players such as Mollon, Maylee Attin-Johnson, Kennya Cordner and Tasha St Louis.

“We have some girls coming through but of course I would like it to be more,” Corneal said. “That era of players, they were part of good long-term development. A lot of time was put in with those players many years ago and a lot of them blossomed to become quite competent players.

“We just have to make sure that we put in that development to make sure that we have players continuously going through the programme and we would be able to get them to their fullest potential.”

He suggested that there was some confusion about what the real goals of the different age-group programmes are.

“You are not producing a player for the Under-17 or Under-20 level,” he said, “you are producing a national player. You are aiming to produce a national senior player and he or she should be able to produce for many years.”

The National Elite Young Program aside, Corneal reckons that the TTFA plans for additional training pitches and dormitories at the Ato Boldon Stadium site put the country on the right path to future player development.

“We could have more than one national youth team […] or more than one elite team training on the day,” Corneal said. “That can be our way of bringing them together and this goes for both girls and boys. […] That is something we probably should have had 15 years ago. But everything happens in its time.

“It takes patience and it takes planning. Or it takes planning and it takes patience. We are working on a plan and we have to wait and see what will happen in the next three to four years.”

RELATED NEWS

“The girls played their heart out!” Shabazz praises U-20’s effort as they bow out after third loss.
By Amiel Mohammed (Wired868).


For the third time in six days, Trinidad and Tobago’s Junior Women Soca Warriors scored first in a first round match during the CONCACAF Under-20 Women’s Championship at the Ato Boldon Stadium. That’s the good news.

For the third time in six days, Trinidad and Tobago’s Junior Women Soca Warriors suffered defeat, failing to hold onto a lead in their final Group A encounter against Costa Rica and therefore waving a low-key goodbye to the tournament. That is by no means good news.

In front of a significantly smaller crowd than was the case in their first two games, the Jamaal Shabazz-coached women fell 2-1 to a Costa Rican outfit that fielded as many as eight new faces in their starting line-up.

If the tactic worked for Costa Rica, for Haiti, who went with nine changes to their starting line-up, it backfired. They were comprehensively beaten 4-0 by Group toppers Canada in the earlier match of the double-header.

Coach Shabazz was proud of his players’ effort but once again bemoaned their inability to convert a lead into victory.

“I think the girls played their heart out tonight and [I’m] very satisfied that they gave of their best,” Shabazz told the media at the post-match briefing. “We know we’ve got to make a better preparation going forward and try to prepare a team that can be more intense in the battles.

“We have to become a nation that when the hard times come, we show more resilience. We’ve got to improve the battles on the training pitch and in doing so, it can transform on the field.

“I think that the girls gave a great account of themselves tonight […] (It was) unfortunate that we had to go down because of a penalty.”

Within seconds of entering the pitch at the start of the second half, substitute Fabiola Villalobos won and converted a penalty conceded by the once more largely impressive K’lil Keshwar in the T&T goal.

Racing to dispute possession of a ball with Villalobos, Keshwar failed to make any contact with the ball and clattered into the Costa Rican attacker. Villalobos appealed successfully to United States referee Ekaterina Koroleva for a penalty, picked herself up off the ground and calmly put the ball past Keshwar from the spot.

Shabazz is not certain that that is what should have happened.

“I am not one to complain about the referees,” he said, “(but) tonight I wish I was a FIFA referee. […] I feel sorry for my young ladies tonight. […] I think that we have been very unfortunate with some decisions…”

The penalty put the wind in the sails of the Costa Ricans, who went in search of a winner and got it from the feet of tricky attacker Hillary Corrales.

Corrales had started on the bench in the previous match versus Haiti but had come on to score and put a mighty scare into their French–speaking opponents before her side eventually held out for the 3-2 win.

Getting the start against the hosts, though, Corrales merely kicked on from where she had left off, taking full advantage of a laid-back T&T side who were very charitable with acreage on the pitch.

In the 55th minute, capitalising on a deflected header by Sheneika Paul, the unmarked Corrales stole in, beat Keshwar to the ball at the back post and contrived to flick it around the giant keeper, leaving the recovering defenders pressing in vain to clear the attempt off the goal-line.

Alongside captain and Player-of-the-Match Gloriana Villalobos, Corrales had T&T firmly on the backfoot from the first whistle. They were, however, hit with a sucker punch in the 37th minute when, with their first sequence of meaningful possession, the hosts opened the scoring.

Ranae Ward set the overlapping Jaasiel Forde free down the right and she played an incisive lofted pass into the path of hotshot attacker Dennecia Prince. With her first touch, she made a yard of space for herself and then coolly placed the ball between the goalkeeper’s legs.

It was as deft and as clinical a finish as they come.

The item was Prince’s second goal of the tournament and Shabazz certainly sees a bright future for his young attacker if she can maintain her progress.

“She has had some explosive moments,” said Shabazz. “You can see a player that, with a lot more fitness, a higher level of fitness achieved, […] is […] ready to graduate to the senior team.”

While Prince (D) may have been the decisive player in the game, it was her namesake and partner-in-crime Aaliyah Prince and Keshwar who caught the eye of Costa Rica coach Amelia Valverde.

“It’s (T&T) a very balanced team as well as there are many strong players that are the reference of the team,” Valverde told the media after the match. For example, the goalkeeper (Keshwar), she has a very good form and also the number 10 (Aliyah Prince) is very impressive.”

At the end of the narrow 3-2 loss to Haiti on Saturday, Valverde had announced that, in the final game versus T&T, she would be offering playing time to some of her younger players and hoped that they would seize the opportunity to finish the tournament strongly.

At the end of the 90 minutes on Monday, she was pleased with what she had seen.

“We saw that the changes we made were very coherent and the players were able to adjust,” said Valverde. “This game was very tight but we had the goal of knowing that we were not able to qualify (but) we still wanted to win this game. This victory helps us to wash (away) what happened on Saturday.”

Saturday’s Group A encounter between Marc Collat’s Haiti team and Costa Rica had seen a tenacious, aggressive Haitian team taking the fight to their opponents. Against the Canadians yesterday, however, that description was furthest from the truth.

Fielding only Ruthny Mathurin and Tabita K. Joseph from among the starters in the previous game, Haiti were a mere shadow of their true selves and Canada tore into them from the first whistle.

With experienced captain Gabby Carle restored to her starting berth after being rested versus T&T, the North Americans threatened to run away with the game in the first half as a Shana Flynn hattrick left the Haitians reeling 0-3 down within the first 18 minutes.

Although tournament leading goal-scorer Jordyn Huitema couldn’t get her name on the scoresheet, she was involved in everything good that her team did.

She set up Flynn to tap in the opener on the second attempt. Flynn followed that up with an excellent arching shot into the top corner two minutes later before rounding out her hattrick in the 18th minute.

Collat’s introduction of his 15-year-old starlet Daelle Dumonay in the second half brought some much-needed direction and fight to the Haitians. However, when substitute Tanya Boychuk headed home Canada’s fourth after an error by goalkeeper Naphtaline Clermeus, the result was done and dusted and the final standings settled with Canada at the top.

Collat’s team selection—and, arguably, the manner in which they approached the game—seemed to indicate that Haiti’s clear priority was their semi-final match up against whichever of Mexico or the USA runs out winner in the other group.

The final first round matches come off today. With Canada and Haiti having already qualified for the next round before kick-off yesterday, the Group B sides will now know precisely which of the two they will be up against if they win. It might inspire both teams in the second encounter at 6.30pm when the USA play Mexico.

Before that at 4pm, the heartbroken Jamaican outfit, who were mere minutes away from registering their first point of the tournament versus USA, will face Nicaragua as both teams bid the competition au revoir.

« Last Edit: January 26, 2018, 03:04:43 AM by Flex »
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Offline Flex

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #653 on: January 26, 2018, 02:56:09 AM »
Preparation to compete, not to participate.
By Alvin Corneal (Guardian).


It will be unfair for me to express disappointment over the three T&T match defeats in Group A of the FIFA concacaf Women's Under-20 tournament over the past week.

My desire to comment on the performances of each team in the competition would have been inaccurate, if only because I had seen none of the countries in practice sessions, not even the Caribbean representatives T&T and Jamaica.

Hearing the coaches' descriptions of their team chances clearly brought to the listeners a level of confidence and add some encouraging expressions which implied success.

Having learnt from more experienced coaches over the years, I never comment with optimism or any form of certainty about teams I have not seen on the field in practice or more specifically, competitive matches.

So my trip to the Ato Boldon Stadium for matches of T&T versus Haiti, followed by Costa Rica versus Canada was my lesson.

I actually visited the dressing room of the Home team to wish them luck, knowing that nervousness, apprehension, and lack of knowledge of their opponents was as timid to both countries.

Skip the eventual results of the matches, and start the process of making a careful study of the physical capabilities by both teams, there were some startling observations which appeared to expose the differences between both countries.

The presence of effort in the speed department brought an early attraction of the host country, especially as it did what most home teams wish to achieve when playing at home.

Two goals in seven minutes could not have been a better start and a feeling which brought joy to the local fans.

However, before the tram could capitalise upon the lead, there appeared to have suspicions that fast forward by speed of players chasing long balls, maybe because it resulted in scoring the two goals, would have brought home victory.

An absence in organised build up through inter-passing and splitting the opponents' defence caused some mistakes of giving the ball away.

It is then that the Haitians demonstrated their careful possession sequence which saw the home team chasing shadows and tiring themselves without gaining repossession of the ball.

This descriptive chapter of well executed passing by the Haitians produced a positive effect where the opposing team could not stop the plan which the visitors demonstrated continuously and penetrated the T&T defence easily and intelligently as they recognised the weaknesses in the home team's approach.

The balance of the match left the fans believing that the Haitians applied themselves in a manner that showed great cohesion, impressive switching of positions and creating some clever passing lanes.

Their finishing was superb and our women were chasing shadows in a manner which challenged their match fitness.

Canada and Costa Rica were clearly ready for the hard fought game which they needed to play. The speed of Canada was reduced not as successful in the first half, because Costa Rica had great possession, good skill by their midfielders and glimpses of scoring opportunities.

However, Canada's fitness level was their main area of strength and in the second half, demolished their opponents, leaving their opponents to have sleepless nights.

Admittedly, our team improved with each match, but just could not match any department of the game to retain superiority.

Without going to the next group, I wish to emphasise the shortage of preparation of the local team. Not for a want of trying, but for the absence of utilising physical science needed for improving the age group of girls between 15 and 19 years.

Historically, our women have not been introduced to a game as rigorous as football.

Our attention must be given to careful methods which will prepare the muscular progress of our girls and women.

The answer lies squarely on the shoulders on the persons who are given the duties to develop women's football. An exercise physiologist is an essential person to work assiduously with the girls and gradually mesh their muscle strength with their natural skills. Coaches will then be able to help their speed levels, their sharp swift movements of changing direction when the need arose..

Our most appropriate lessons will be to scrutinise the top teams in the competition and there will be visible answers which could be used by our coaching staff for the next step in our progress line for Football.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #654 on: January 26, 2018, 07:00:19 AM »
WATCH: Maylee Attin-Johnson calls for more investment in local women's football as she talks about our participation at the 2018 CONCACAF Under-20 Women’s Championship.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/BLMsMmHBc3c" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/BLMsMmHBc3c</a>
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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #655 on: January 27, 2018, 06:06:42 AM »
Eve: Football administration let us down.
By Walter Alibey (Guardian).


Impossible to coach more than one team at one time

The T&T Football Association is being blamed for the series of win-less results at the CONCACAF Under-20 Women's Championship, which is now into the final round.

The final and third-place play-offs will take place tomorrow at the Ato Boldon Stadium in Couva, and the T&T team, being coached Jamaal Shabazz will be seated in the stands watching, having lost all its matches in the preliminary rounds of the tournament. Shabazz's coaching techniques came in for harsh criticisms at the end of the preliminary rounds, and yesterday Angus Eve, a former national player and coach said the Morvant Caledonia United coach was put in a situation where he just could not win.

Eve took a swipe at the administrators of the sport for handing Shabazz the coaching job, while he already had the responsibility of coaching the country's under-17 and senior national women's teams.

According to Eve, "In no other country in the world do you have one coach in charge of multiple teams. I saw Shabazz abroad with the under-17 team and when he was back, he was given the responsibility of the coaching the under-20 team. In addition, he also had the senior women's team to deal with, so, he just could not win in that under-20 tournament."

"I think the administrators of the sport here have let down the team, and by extension the country" Eve said.

He called for the myth that local coaches are incapable of coaching at an international level to be dismissed totally, saying the time has come for the T&TFA to stop reverting to the same women's-team coaches year after year. "We all know that Shabazz is an excellent coach, but he cannot do it all. Therefore, it's time the administrators of the sport give other coaches, other than those who have been in charge of the women's teams in the past, the opportunity to coach also," said Eve.

The Soca Princesses scored first but lost to Haiti 2-3, to Canada 1-4 and 1-2 to Costa Rica to finish the tournament with no points. And there was no disguise to the lack of organization in defence and attack that may have been contributing factors to the team's demise.

Eve however made it clear the administration was purely to blame for this one and not the coaching, and stressed on the numerous responsibilities coaches have while carrying out their duties.

"I saw a team filled with talent. I saw Dennecia Prince take down a ball while in full flight and scored. I also saw the TT team take the lead on three occasions which were clear indications that they can play, but the administration let them down badly and also let the country down in the process" Eve said.

The real measure of a man's character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #656 on: January 27, 2018, 06:09:40 AM »
TTFA boss mum on poor preparation for U-20s.
By Stephon Nicholas (Newsday).


Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president David John-Williams is mum for now despite the national Under-20 women’s team’s embarrassing early exit from the CONCACAF Women’s U-20 Championships hosted here in Trinidad.

T&T ran out of steam in all three of their group A matches to end their campaign without a point despite taking the lead in all three of their matches.

T&T took a stunning 2-0 lead inside 12 minutes in their first game against Haiti but eventually lost 3-2. They lost to defending champions Canada 4-1 after scoring first, and were beaten 2-1 by Costa Rica in their final game after again taking a first half lead.

Speaking after T&T were eliminated, national coach Jamaal Shabazz, echoing comments made prior to the tournament where he pleaded for international warm-up matches, bemoaned the lack of proper preparation for his players.

“We have got to learn our lesson from this and be very honest with ourselves, and know that we have got to make better preparations going forward, and try to get the team to be more intense in the battles,” he said.

Contacted yesterday, John-Williams said he needs to conduct a debriefing with the coaching staff of the Under-20s before commenting.

“Chief, I prefer not to comment on that until we have a debrief meeting. That’s how I will stop,” he said.

Asked why he needed a debrief meeting to respond to the coach who prior, during and after the tournament spoke of a lack of fitness and preparation, John-Williams reiterated, “When we have a debrief meeting about the tournament, then I will make my comments. please appreciate that.”

Speaking to Newsday yesterday, former national women’s senior captain Maylee Attin Johnson said it was “unfortunate” that the T&T girls were unable to show their true worth.

“It is unfortunate. I don’t think they were given the proper tools to execute and play at that level, and it is unfortunate having a tournament at home and not giving the girls everything possible to perform at the best level – it was seen on the field,” she said.

Asked if this could do more harm than good for the players, Maylee, who captained T&T to within a victory of qualifying for the 2015 Women’s World Cup, said: “Obviously, if you fail to prepare then your prepare to fail and that was shown in the three games. You can see they have talent because this team went up sometimes two goals in every game they played and went on to lose.

It was lack of preparation, lack of strategy, lack of fitness and lack of a lot of things. Having a team for two to three months, the one thing that should have been going for them was fitness and that was shown to be not their strong point,” she said.

VIDEO - Maylee Attin-Johnson Calls For More Investment In Local Women's Football

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Offline maxg

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #657 on: January 27, 2018, 09:25:30 AM »
The team was begging ppl to come out to the games for weeks. Stadium empty, after the fact, everybody seeing the issue , everyone have opinions. Why y’all don’t make the stands full so ppl seeing what go on for themselves . Why not make the statements before, why not get your clubs to be out supporting the women. Even school trips, organizing buses. Is yuh National team. Yet after the loss or win, is about the play and lack of preparation. Preparation has to be National level all around, not just for on the field



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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #658 on: January 27, 2018, 12:15:41 PM »

sorry to bring allyuh to reality given the consistent failure of teams from national to youth, men and women, the public has no strong desire to pay their money and come out in numbers. That is just the reality of the situation, this is the result of little support at games you eventually get when almost every time you pay your money to see your team and they did not just loose but play shit and not give their all in almost every game. The toll of seeing shit football on the field and feeling disappointment over so many years has resonated with fans.

Our T&T football teams have to convince the fans they are giving their all and the TTFF has to lead the effort to bring us back to at least succeeding at the regional level for fans to come back out in suitable numbers to support at the games. That is the reality!
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Offline maxg

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Re: 2018 CFU Women's U-20 Championship Thread
« Reply #659 on: January 27, 2018, 01:39:59 PM »
well, i must conclude the fan support must be real shit too.
in my time and even now in most sports around the world, is the fan base that drives the athletes/players to excellence, it the fan base that drives the sport..the sport is not what drives the fan base...so let's also face that piece of reality as well..
hard earned money going to a lot of other shit instead, to bad we doh have a Fete National team,  we fanbase wudda just get wineing mix up with winning ans we would probably lorse that too... we teams not winning, so we cyah wine, so F dat...cyah spend we money dey, no wine to get    :devil: