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Offline kaiser

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The benefits of the SSFL
« on: December 02, 2011, 06:47:54 PM »
    Plenty of folks come on here and cry down the SSFL even the Director of Youth Football in T&T Cornmeal say the SSFL is counterproductive but to me that is a load of sh;t . I watch to SSFL games and i go to pro league games and actually the standard of the two not all that different,the SSFL provides a stage for these young men to develop camaraderie and belief and it gives them the experience of football being played with a level of importance and meaning. It gives them self worth and discipline and offers them an opportunity, once they bright enough to further their studies via the us college system.
    In the last 30 or so years most of our internationals {unless they born outside T&T} and professionals have all passed through this same system and they have turned out allright in fact they have exceeded and gone on to bigger and better because they had this platform to begin with.
     So in closing all the haters of SSFL i think a lot of you either want to dam the bridge that others crossed because some of you are so caught in a sense of nostalgia that in your  time it was better and the men had more skill and was bigger etc, wake up from your walks down memory lane and support this essential piece of our football development and pay it the importance and respect it deserves.

Offline Bakes

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2011, 07:08:35 PM »
From a footballing standpoint... SSFL is shit and a waste of time.

Offline Cowen

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2011, 07:22:59 PM »
From a footballing standpoint... SSFL is shit and a waste of time.

.....given it's present structure. I think with a bit of reformatting and mandatory coaching license for all all SSFL coaches the standard of play can once again reach previous levels.

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Offline kaiser

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2011, 07:39:15 PM »
From a footballing standpoint... SSFL is shit and a waste of time.

real lil boy answer yes.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2011, 07:56:17 PM »
Unless the Clubs get serious money to run a youth system, I do not see any alternative. Since the inclusion of all schools and the creation of zones, the talent has diluted and in so doing the standard appears to have fallen.

 In the past the CFL used to be the engine for youth football. It was constricted to Benedicts, Naps, Pres, later Sando Tech, Saints, FAtima, QRC, Belmont. Now St. Anthony's.  All the "best" players used to congregate to those schools. So those schools had the talent. Not so anymore. The SSFL going to run their footbal whether the TTFFand Pro-league run their youth program. That is part of the educational process.

 What should happen is that each pro team or teams that are close to each other should open their own schools to educate the players who decided that they want a path to pro football. Isn't that what happens in Europe?

The local youth must bear in mind that if the pro thing don't pan out, then it is up to him to go in another direction. He could go the university at home or abroad( his own money or if he has connections(a government  scholarship)).  Depending on what kind of contract you sign, you may not be eligible to play university ball in the US. At least in the NCAA sanctioned sports system. Maybe NAIA? I don't know.

Offline Bakes

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2011, 10:38:48 PM »
From a footballing standpoint... SSFL is shit and a waste of time.

real lil boy answer yes.

Befitting the recipient.

Offline Coop's

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2011, 11:05:59 PM »
I am one who have always fought the notion that the SSFL is a waste of time,my reasoning for it is that it has always been a support/base for our Footballers in the country,they never had qualified Coaches etc etc like people are calling for today,this is one issue i differed from my friend Anton when he said that.
What has differed today from the past is the watered down version of what we used to have due to the current structure of the schools system in T&T,the thing is there are pros and cons to this,one is more kids have an opportunity to play Soccer and two if you are not at the schools with the best Coaches/programs you not going to get any where.
Although the clubs might be the best option,in T&T it's too much pressure on the clubs,they clubs are struggling with their senior teams and the Youths get little attention,don't try to compare us with Europe it's like Apples and Oranges,we have to design a program that suits T&T and not copy what other people doing.I remember growing up it had so many Youth leagues all over the country,i played mostly in Aranguez and Barataria,most of us who played in those leagues guys like Selby Browne,Winfield St Hill,Ronnie Jackson etc  just to name a few came out of those leagues,ah mean who was the Coach but that was then we are dealing with now,two different scenarios.
Soccer is just messed up at home and is all because we want instant success,nobody has the patience to give any program a chance to grow,we are money driven that's what motivate players and unless we don't get back to the days of the passion and love for the game we will always have situations like we been having recently.
You know i wonder if any sport at all benefit from the school system today,what about Cricket, Basketball,Netball,Athletics etc etc where are our future sportsmen and women coming from,how are they being developed.         

Offline Bakes

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2011, 12:03:35 AM »
If the goal is increasing participation... and ah li'l competition, then the SSFL is boss.  If the goal is developing footballers ("from a footballing standpoint") then it's a waste of time.  Don't quite know when the product became as poor as it is right now, but there aren't enough games, and competitive games among quality opponents, for players to develop.

Offline Coop's

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2011, 05:15:05 AM »
If the goal is increasing participation... and ah li'l competition, then the SSFL is boss.  If the goal is developing footballers ("from a footballing standpoint") then it's a waste of time.  Don't quite know when the product became as poor as it is right now, but there aren't enough games, and competitive games among quality opponents, for players to develop.
       In the US, Youth Soccer is all about participation and having fun and they get top quality players from that,if these kids not enjoying the game you loose them in a very short time,there must be some where,league,level of the game etc etc for every one to enjoy regardless of ability and this is what the schools provide.The thing is who more serious and feel they can play at higher levels go for it,it's an option but the SSFL is not there to produce national team players but you will always find national team players coming from there,check our history.   

Offline elan

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2011, 07:37:33 AM »
If the goal is increasing participation... and ah li'l competition, then the SSFL is boss.  If the goal is developing footballers ("from a footballing standpoint") then it's a waste of time.  Don't quite know when the product became as poor as it is right now, but there aren't enough games, and competitive games among quality opponents, for players to develop.
       In the US, Youth Soccer is all about participation and having fun and they get top quality players from that,if these kids not enjoying the game you loose them in a very short time,there must be some where,league,level of the game etc etc for every one to enjoy regardless of ability and this is what the schools provide.The thing is who more serious and feel they can play at higher levels go for it,it's an option but the SSFL is not there to produce national team players but you will always find national team players coming from there,check our history.   

Exactly which part of the US is that?
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Offline Deeks

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2011, 08:36:15 AM »
In the US, Youth Soccer is all about participation and having fun

Elan, there is some truth to that. Youth football is huge in this country. There is huge amount of talented players who play. Most of them are very serious about the game. You know the college coaches always scouting the youth tournaments for good players to improve their program. But there are a lot of kids into for the fun of. They know they may not get pro contract or even scholarships. They into with their peers until they reach college age when they make up their minds on what to do with football.

My son played against Nick Deleon in AYSO national final in Tennesse about 3 yrs ago.

Offline elan

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2011, 08:47:21 AM »
In the US, Youth Soccer is all about participation and having fun

Elan, there is some truth to that. Youth football is huge in this country. There is huge amount of talented players who play. Most of them are very serious about the game. You know the college coaches always scouting the youth tournaments for good players to improve their program. But there are a lot of kids into for the fun of. They know they may not get pro contract or even scholarships. They into with their peers until they reach college age when they make up their minds on what to do with football.

My son played against Nick Deleon in AYSO national final in Tennesse about 3 yrs ago.

What you saying and what Coop's saying is a bit of a difference. It's not all about particpation. Ask the kids who cannot afford to pay to play.
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Offline Deeks

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2011, 10:02:54 AM »
Ask the kids who cannot afford to pay to play.

Elan, so true. Youth soccer can be quite expensive. Especially travelling and accomodation cost.  Some players parent cannot come with that kind of money for their kids. A lot of the "wealthier"  and kind hearted parents would sometimes come up with the money for a player or two.

I remember my son had  a tournament in Disney on Boxing Day. I send him but could not go. When his team played in AYSO, the regional was in New Hampshire and the finals in Tennesse. All the transport and accomodation cost came out of my  pocket. And not the mention the myriads of tournaments up and down the US east coast we had participated over the years..

Offline ZANDOLIE

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2011, 10:49:08 AM »


I remember my son had  a tournament in Disney on Boxing Day. I send him but could not go. When his team played in AYSO, the regional was in New Hampshire and the finals in Tennesse. All the transport and accomodation cost came out of my  pocket. And not the mention the myriads of tournaments up and down the US east coast we had participated over the years..

Within this sentence lies the key to the key. Getting bacl to T&T football, the thing that is killing us is conservative tired old thought, usually centering around mimicing or adopting steps taken in the U.S. or Europe. As a vehicle for directly producing quality material for the national team the SSFL is poor and has been for some time. But as an activity outlet for including less talented players and for those looking for scholarships it is great. Looking at

SSFL cannot return to its glory days without a serious improvement in the primary schools league. The times when you could talk about starting development at 14-15 years old are gone never to return.

A serious push has to be made in what they used to call Giants football, that is the U-14 'league'. When I played there was no national championship in Giants or any serious thought put into coaching kids of this age group. Dunno how much things have changed or how they have changed but no point of having no competitive league or good coaching between primary school and senior school boy football

Its time to stop this thinking that competition within our borders is enough to sustain competitive development. That is based on outdated notions of nationalism and little else. The SSFL should primarily be for promotion of inclusion and participation. When it comes to our top players we have to move outside that and foucs more on TOURNAMENTS and getting experience and confidence playing against great players and great teams in the region. The TTFF has finally begun to realize this in the past 3-4 years. The annual dust-up with the Jamaican school boy champs was a good idea. But how about hosting a Caribbean Intercol championship with likes of Haiti, JA, B'dos, St Kitts and maybe even U.S. or Mexican schools  With a more transparent, accountable system and prospects of a return on investment, we may be able to entice sponsors to help offsets costs for something along these lines.

Conversely we should be sending youths whether as part of school competition or not, off to other regional tournaments. Coca cola was gracious enough to sponsor an EFA team last year to a major tournament in Argentina I think?

But doing this consistently is a pure pipe dream with the same people and practices still entrenched in football.
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Offline Bakes

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2011, 10:52:41 AM »
       In the US, Youth Soccer is all about participation and having fun and they get top quality players from that,if these kids not enjoying the game you loose them in a very short time,there must be some where,league,level of the game etc etc for every one to enjoy regardless of ability and this is what the schools provide.The thing is who more serious and feel they can play at higher levels go for it,it's an option but the SSFL is not there to produce national team players but you will always find national team players coming from there,check our history.   

Which "US" is that?  Certainly not the United States. Maybe in the rec leagues and pick up games.

Offline Bakes

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2011, 10:54:45 AM »
Elan, there is some truth to that. Youth football is huge in this country. There is huge amount of talented players who play. Most of them are very serious about the game. You know the college coaches always scouting the youth tournaments for good players to improve their program. But there are a lot of kids into for the fun of. They know they may not get pro contract or even scholarships. They into with their peers until they reach college age when they make up their minds on what to do with football.

My son played against Nick Deleon in AYSO national final in Tennesse about 3 yrs ago.

I not as involved as I used to be, but as soon as these kids start approaching their teens, if they have any talent at all they soon transfer to competitive club football.  It's not at all about fun... is about youth teams with national sponsors traveling and  competing nationally against each other.  If the kids happen to have fun while at it then that is a tangential benefit at most.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2011, 11:15:56 AM »
Elan, there is some truth to that. Youth football is huge in this country. There is huge amount of talented players who play. Most of them are very serious about the game. You know the college coaches always scouting the youth tournaments for good players to improve their program. But there are a lot of kids into for the fun of. They know they may not get pro contract or even scholarships. They into with their peers until they reach college age when they make up their minds on what to do with football.

My son played against Nick Deleon in AYSO national final in Tennesse about 3 yrs ago.



I not as involved as I used to be, but as soon as these kids start approaching their teens, if they have any talent at all they soon transfer to competitive club football.  It's not at all about fun... is about youth teams with national sponsors traveling and  competing nationally against each other.  If the kids happen to have fun while at it then that is a tangential benefit at most.

Another viewpoint I agree with. Cool.

Offline kaiser

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2011, 12:35:50 PM »
Elan, there is some truth to that. Youth football is huge in this country. There is huge amount of talented players who play. Most of them are very serious about the game. You know the college coaches always scouting the youth tournaments for good players to improve their program. But there are a lot of kids into for the fun of. They know they may not get pro contract or even scholarships. They into with their peers until they reach college age when they make up their minds on what to do with football.

My son played against Nick Deleon in AYSO national final in Tennesse about 3 yrs ago.



I not as involved as I used to be, but as soon as these kids start approaching their teens, if they have any talent at all they soon transfer to competitive club football.  It's not at all about fun... is about youth teams with national sponsors traveling and  competing nationally against each other.  If the kids happen to have fun while at it then that is a tangential benefit at most.

Another viewpoint I agree with. Cool.



 Tbh it is not about participation and fun in the SSFL I go to most of the games South.North,East and Central and i can attest to the competitive and serious nature of the contest these guys sacrifice a lot for their schools as for some of them it is their only launching pad to bigger things, these kids if most don't know are playing football in the pro league youth structure from u 14 level case in point St Anthonys College most of them have been playing together in school and as Jabloteh's youth team , Eldo this year is Joe public's youth team for a couple years now and i could go on. I think the attitude of a lot of people is to condemn and attack what the don't know much about. P.S this year the winners of each zone in the SSFL have gone forward into the F.A cup draw to play against Pro League and Super League opposition so i think that's pretty serious.

Offline ragga

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2011, 02:26:53 PM »
The November edition of the 442 magazine (fourfourtwo.com) presents an article "Youth Development Part 4: URUGUAY - Scotland! This could be you..." which touches on many points that have been discusssed/presented/suggested on this forum in regards to problems and solutions for T&T football.

This is not a sugestion to mimic Uruguay (Zando mentioned, we are always looking to mimic steps taken in the US and Europe) but instead learn something from them since they are somewhat similiar to us in regards to their small population and limited resources. I view the article as being very relevant to this SSL thread because an education component is defined in their development process. No need to mention their acheivements in the last few years since most of you already know that.

I will higly reccommend reviewing the article.

Here are a few points from the article:

- when Tabarez took over the national team in 2006 - a non-negotiable part of the contract - was to take over not just the senior team but all the junveniles teams also

- Tabarez is also part of a governement project "Goal to the Future" which monitors 4,000 youngsters, not only from fotball aspect but from educational standpoint - "We want to offer them more tools in case they don't arrive. If we have a 14-year-od Messi who doesn't want to go to school then he is out of the national team. Studying is non-negotiable."

- here is how they acheive a broad base of players at the lower ages - it starts at what they call "baby football" playing 5-a-side on concrete pitches - yes CONCRETE - not turf or plastic grass - focus being on developing technique before the age of 12 (the point here is if you were born and grew in T&T in the 1950's like me, we did not have as many field like today, plus we had 1-ball in the whole village - and the amount of patch that tube had to keep it going year after year - and yet it appears we were able to acheive more with less)

- "before 2007, clubs looked to make a quick buck by selling their best youngsters to the 1st overseas bidder, often to the long-term detriment of the player. Now Tabarez has made them see the bigger picture."

- "we're are not only few in the amount of footballers but also few in the audience, and this means it is very hard to attract sponsors since the local market is less and less significant" (sure sounds similiar to us in T&T).

I read it from a hard copy of the magazine, but pretty sure the tech savvy guys can access it online.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2011, 03:49:03 PM »
As much as I had loved playing in the road back home, I limit the playing time on concrete as much as possible . But Tabarez model is something we could study and see how it could work for us.

Offline Coop's

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2011, 04:03:59 PM »
In the US, Youth Soccer is all about participation and having fun

Elan, there is some truth to that. Youth football is huge in this country. There is huge amount of talented players who play. Most of them are very serious about the game. You know the college coaches always scouting the youth tournaments for good players to improve their program. But there are a lot of kids into for the fun of. They know they may not get pro contract or even scholarships. They into with their peers until they reach college age when they make up their minds on what to do with football.

My son played against Nick Deleon in AYSO national final in Tennesse about 3 yrs ago.

What you saying and what Coop's saying is a bit of a difference. It's not all about particpation. Ask the kids who cannot afford to pay to play.
       Elan,i'm not here to argue or fight eh Breds,it's just an open discusion where we can shear our views and ideas.Do you know it have a lot of kids that play Soccer for schools that don't play for any Club,if you go around most schools you will observe they play pick up Soccer in the school yard for recreation,not everybody serious about the game it's just that some find it fasinating just to kick a ball,some like the socializing part of it,i agree with what most of the posters contributed here that's why i said there should be some where for every one that wants to play Soccer to play,it happens right here in the US it even have Soccer for handicap kids(Special Olympics).I don't care what you all might think but discrediting the SSFL and Minor League Football is affecting our Football,if you kill the roots the tree going to die.   

Offline Bakes

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2011, 04:43:19 PM »
I don't care what you all might think but discrediting the SSFL and Minor League Football is affecting our Football,if you kill the roots the tree going to die.   

It's not about discrediting it... it's about an honest assessment of the league and the role it plays in the development of our youth players... which is to say none.  Another thing that needs a handle is free "transfer" of players between schools.  Whatever competition there is in the league, it's hard to say that the kids, rather than the schools and coaches, are the ones benefitting.

Offline elan

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2011, 07:07:04 PM »
In the US, Youth Soccer is all about participation and having fun

Elan, there is some truth to that. Youth football is huge in this country. There is huge amount of talented players who play. Most of them are very serious about the game. You know the college coaches always scouting the youth tournaments for good players to improve their program. But there are a lot of kids into for the fun of. They know they may not get pro contract or even scholarships. They into with their peers until they reach college age when they make up their minds on what to do with football.

My son played against Nick Deleon in AYSO national final in Tennesse about 3 yrs ago.

What you saying and what Coop's saying is a bit of a difference. It's not all about particpation. Ask the kids who cannot afford to pay to play.
       Elan,i'm not here to argue or fight eh Breds,it's just an open discusion where we can shear our views and ideas.Do you know it have a lot of kids that play Soccer for schools that don't play for any Club,if you go around most schools you will observe they play pick up Soccer in the school yard for recreation,not everybody serious about the game it's just that some find it fasinating just to kick a ball,some like the socializing part of it,i agree with what most of the posters contributed here that's why i said there should be some where for every one that wants to play Soccer to play,it happens right here in the US it even have Soccer for handicap kids(Special Olympics).I don't care what you all might think but discrediting the SSFL and Minor League Football is affecting our Football,if you kill the roots the tree going to die.   

No ones arguing
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Offline Flex

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2011, 05:38:10 AM »
The magic of schoolboy football
By Hartley Anderson
Jamaica Observer.


SCHOOLBOY football has always sparked unparalleled interest in this country. As such, it is ironic the local governing body has not exploited its popularity by recognising and treating it as a plausible feeder programme for the respective national teams though I suspect the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) would reject this claim.

For, at a time when the majority of Premier League teams struggle to fill their venues on match days, there is hardly a schoolboy football game where a decent gathering of spectators is not a given.

Therefore, as the grand climax of another such season draws apace, an exploration of the disparity that obtains between the two scenarios is perhaps both timely and relevant.

Since history is, in fact, the genesis of tradition, a perusal of the past is a logical starting point, with yesterday's capacity crowd at Jarrett Park to witness the daCosta Cup showdown between Rusea's and STETHS an appropriate backdrop for this discourse.

Without a doubt, our relatively fledgling history in education, which has more than a tinge of colonial influence, has contributed significantly to the prestige accorded high school sporting contests in Jamaica.

Here, it must be borne in mind that it has only been two decades or so since a plethora of high schools emerged the majority hitherto being known as secondary schools that were not allowed to play in either competition the prestigious Manning or daCosta Cup.

In fact, for years these second-tier institutions functioned as feeder schools for the traditional ones, with the unethical atmosphere that attended the frenetic recruitment (or 'buying') of such players in the name of sporting success and bragging rights a contentious talking point to this day.

It also casts a dubious shadow over many a schoolboy championship side, with the stories of boys not attending classes but turning up at training and on match days an unfortunate but enduring memory for many.

Further, as has been previously mentioned here, the aforementioned competitions were conceptualised in an environment where a high school education represented the zenith of academic ambitions and achievement for the majority of students and their parents.

Pervasively, tertiary education was a nebulous concept ne'er to be realised by the vast majority of the population and spurred by the belief that nothing existed beyond the realm of high school.

The term 'college' that is still attached to some of those institutions no doubt lent credence to this idea, but nonetheless served to underscore the importance of the schoolboy leagues and the phenomenal wave of popularity with which it has always been attended.

Thankfully, however, the exclusive nature of schoolboy sports in general has dramatically changed, to the extent that a number of non-traditional schools have etched their names on either trophy over the past few years. This list includes Norman Manley, Charlie Smith and Bridgeport in the Manning Cup, and Godfrey Stewart, Frome Technical, Garvey Maceo and St James High in the daCosta Cup.

Similarly, it may be argued that the recent paucity of sporting success being experienced by some traditional schools stems from the drying up of these recruitment resources. For, potential recruits now represent their original schools and are accorded similar leverage as far as publicity and the opportunity to be seen by a wider audience is concerned.

This is a positive scenario as it forces schools to utilise their own home-grown talent. Again, it fosters a more authentic representation while encouraging coaches and physical education teachers to develop their own programmes at the respective schools, if sporting success is the ultimate goal.

On the other hand, the Premier League, though presumably the top competition in the country, enjoys little sentiment or crowd support compared with schoolboy football.

This may be due to its relatively short history, since the semi-professional environment which underpins it is still quite new to Jamaica.

In large measure, however, the standard of football is mostly to be blamed for the pervasive disinterest displayed by the majority of the population including those who are passionate about their favourite English Premier League teams and are equally avid about their favourite schoolboy team.

The uncompromising truth is that club football lacks the important drawing card of established or budding stars. Further, the negative approach adopted by the majority of premiership coaches who would appear to privilege a goalless or low-scoring draw over a thrust for victory, regardless of the outcome, has certainly not helped matters.

In all fairness, however, the standard has also been significantly affected by the many locals now playing overseas. At the last check, Jamaicans were playing in diverse places like El Salvador, Vietnam, Russia and Scandinavia. Of course, an impressive number play with English and United States franchises.

Finally, club football may not, at this point in time, enjoy the popularity of its schoolboy counterpart. But rather than bemoan this reality, it's for the powers that be to use the esteem of the former to generate some momentum.

In fact, would it be such a bad idea for a National Under-23 team to begin playing in the Premier League?
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Offline Coop's

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2011, 06:04:27 AM »
Good article Flex but i guess this may be an exception,Jamaica is just being Jamaica as usual doing what works and suits them.

Offline Deeks

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2011, 09:01:52 AM »
Also bear in mind the demographics in JA is differently from TT. They have a bigger population, hence a bigger pool of players to choose from. But their dedication to sports(especially TF) is what gives them the edge of us.

Offline Tenorsaw

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2011, 05:27:29 PM »
Schools can't be the pipeline for a proper youth structure.  It has to rest with the professional clubs.  First, SSFL is too short and too seasonal; most of the teams will train for a few months in the summer, and sometimes not even that long, to get ready for the September opening.  I'd go for a national SSFL, where the best teams throughout the country play in a league structure, with the other teams retreating to a zonal structure. 

The way to go is the academy system, but this takes some degree of investment and patience.  Imagine, the Red Bulls only have one graduate from their academy that is on their senior team - Juan Agudelo.  It takes some time before you see the results flowing through the pipeline, but that is probably the cheaper option in the long run.

Offline Bakes

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2011, 07:39:12 PM »
Good find Flex... article definitely relevant to the discussion, but it so poorly conceptualized and written though.

Quote
SCHOOLBOY football has always sparked unparalleled interest in this country. As such, it is ironic the local governing body has not exploited its popularity by recognising and treating it as a plausible feeder programme for the respective national teams though I suspect the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) would reject this claim.

For, at a time when the majority of Premier League teams struggle to fill their venues on match days, there is hardly a schoolboy football game where a decent gathering of spectators is not a given.

What does "unparalleled interest" have to do with development?  Just because people love school football that means the local federation should consider it as a developmental pool?? Spurious logic.  Then that nugget about EPL teams supposedly struggling to fill venues being compared to "decent" crowds at schoolboy venues.   What??

That whole article is a mess, the author tries entirely too hard to make a point which he alone apparently understands.

Offline asylumseeker

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #28 on: December 05, 2011, 06:46:51 AM »
Good find Flex... article definitely relevant to the discussion, but it so poorly conceptualized and written though.

Quote
SCHOOLBOY football has always sparked unparalleled interest in this country. As such, it is ironic the local governing body has not exploited its popularity by recognising and treating it as a plausible feeder programme for the respective national teams though I suspect the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) would reject this claim.

For, at a time when the majority of Premier League teams struggle to fill their venues on match days, there is hardly a schoolboy football game where a decent gathering of spectators is not a given.

What does "unparalleled interest" have to do with development?  Just because people love school football that means the local federation should consider it as a developmental pool?? Spurious logic.  Then that nugget about EPL teams supposedly struggling to fill venues being compared to "decent" crowds at schoolboy venues.   What??

That whole article is a mess, the author tries entirely too hard to make a point which he alone apparently understands.


That is a reference to the domestic league ... not the EPL.

Offline KND2

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Re: The benefits of the SSFL
« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2011, 08:48:37 AM »
It does not matter what kind of football you play, it will all help your development.

If you playing small goal in the road or academy football for Man U, as long as you getting out there and touching the ball you getting better as a player.

any kind of football is good football,

yes certain trainings may be better than others etc

but the point is there is stuff you can learn playing small goal that you cannot learn playing on an organized team,

There is stuff you can learn playing football for your school that you cannot learn playing for Jabloteh youth team.

the benefits are in the totality of the environments.

 

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